Deborah Rankin

How well do you move?

Do you move fast?

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What?

How is your agility?

Are you talking about my footwork? I thought this blog was about books, not obstacle courses.

We all have hopes, dreams, and ambitions. There is probably something “else” you want from life. It could be something simple like having more friends, or it could be something bigger like starting a business or learning a new skill. To reach those goals you must be able to keep moving despite failure, and find a way around obstacles. Thus, move well. Today my mastermind group discussed:

A business or personal failure, and what you learned from it.

It was powerful, for several reasons.

Admitting failure means I take responsibility.


It’s much easier to complain about “problems,” “issues,” “difficult situations,” or “inconsiderate people.” Regardless of how or why it happened, I don’t learn from it until I take responsibility.

I can’t move on until I learn.

Counselors and therapists suggest that some weird part of our subconscious draws us to people and situations that re-create unhealed issues from the past. Until we learn that lesson and choose a different response, we get stuck fighting the same battles and feeling the same hurts. I know I’ve wasted years of my life struggling with situations I could have learned from much earlier. Have you?

Failure may be a signal to alter course and try a different approach.

Vincent Van Gogh, the renowned post-Impressionist painter, wanted to be a minister but failed the admission exam to theology school. He lost a volunteer job as a missionary because he gave his lodgings to a homeless person. Despite many failures, Van Gogh found his calling and created art still valued.

Vincent van Gogh, 1853 - 1890 Sunflowers 1888 Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 73 cm Bought, Courtauld Fund, 1924 NG3863 http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG3863

Vincent van Gogh, 1853 – 1890
Sunflowers
1888
Oil on canvas, 92.1 x 73 cm
Bought, Courtauld Fund, 1924
NG3863
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG3863

Reading allows us to learn life lessons without going through the failure personally.

When we read fiction and identify with the characters, we learn from their experiences. Biographies give us role models to follow or tell us how despots and dictators might have been stopped. Business and self-help books simulate a one on one conversation with experts.

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I found these quotes about the power of persistence. Which do you like best? Vote by either clicking on the bird to tweet it, or make a comment in the section below.

I have a rule: If I keep complaining about something, I either do something about it or let it go.—Tina Roth Eisenberg  Tweet: I have a rule: If I keep complaining about something, I either do something about it or let it go.—Tina Roth Eisenberg http://bit.ly/21sxAgW

Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcome the consequences of any misfortune.—William James Tweet: Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcome the consequences of any misfortune. —William James

Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.—Pema Chodron Tweet: Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know. —Pema Chodron

Success is not final. Fear is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts.—Winston Churchill Tweet: Success is not final. Fear is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts.—Winston Churchill

I can’t wait to see your favorite, and thank you for contributing.

Up Next

Next week is a video for a book recommended in last week’s birthday commemoration. Reader Amy suggested Beryl Markham’s memoir West With the Night. Ernest Hemingway read this book and wrote a friend “As it is, she has written so well, and marvelously well, that I was completely ashamed of myself as a writer…[she] can write rings around all of us who consider ourselves writers.”

Beryl was abandoned by her mother when she was four and lived with her father until he went bankrupt and lost the beloved family farm. Despite tragedy and failure, Beryl became the first woman to fly an airplane across the Atlantic from east to west and supported herself into her eighties by training racehorses. She moved with speed and agility! I wish the same for you.

© 2016 Booktalk Lady LLC

4 thoughts on “How well do you move?

  1. Thank you for today’s incredible post! I like the Winston Churchill quote best if I had to choose! And West With the Night is one of my favorite books ever, possibly my very favorite if I had to choose one. I look forward to your post on that! All best, Jennifer

    • Kind thanks, Jennifer! A vote for Winston Churchill. West With the Night is magical. She pulls me into every single story.

  2. I also selected the quote from Winston Churchill. Great lesson for each of us. I look forward to next weeks book review. Thank you for keeping us well informed on many topics. All my best. Anne

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